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Understanding construction injuries

Construction jobs can be some of the most perilous for North Carolina workers, and it is important to know how to deal with an injury. Although safety regulations and programs are in place to limit risks for construction employees, accidents are still frequent in this part of the workforce. While avoiding an incident through safe practices on the job is preferable, dealing promptly with an injury can be important for minimizing the impact. As treatment and workers' compensation benefits are sought in connection with a workplace injury, an individual may wonder about liability related to such an issue.

The magnitude of a construction project may relate to the number of individuals and companies potentially responsible for negligence resulting in an accident. In some cases, an incident may be a simple matter of errors in judgement of an employee, possibly the employee who has been injured. In other cases, the actions of a coworker might contribute to an incident.

Responsibility might also be attributed to a property owner, particularly if conditions on the site have been left in a state that may have contributed to an injury. General or subcontractors may be liable for accidents related to their portion of the work on a site. Engineers and architects may be liable if design flaws contribute to an accident. Equipment manufacturers could be liable if an equipment failure results in a construction injury.

In many cases, construction injuries are handled through workers' compensation claims. In some instances, serious negligence resulting in long out-of-work periods, life-changing injuries, loss of a limb or body part, or death could warrant legal action based on who may be deemed liable. An attorney may help in assessing the situation to evaluate the options available.

Source: findlaw.com, "Construction Injury Overview", September 10, 2014

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