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Workers' compensation can help with acid spill injuries

People often kiss their spouses goodbye in the morning and wish for them to have good days at work in North Carolina. However, bad days do happen, and sometimes these bad days can turn into a tough few months if a work accident is involved. Still, workers' compensation benefits certainly can help an injured employee to more confidently cope with this type of situation financially. In a recent out-of-state situation, two contract employees suffered serious burns at a refinery -- the second spill of acid in a short timespan at the job site.

The acid spill was the second one in less than a month's time requiring the attention of a hospital. In the first incident, about 84,000 pounds of sulfuric acid spilled. However, at the time, the company reportedly described this incident to the public as minor.

In the second incident, two employees received hospital treatment after suffering burns from sulfuric acid. Both of the individuals had been wearing protective safety equipment. The incident occurred while the workers were completing regular maintenance tasks.

Because work accidents sometimes occur unexpectedly, companies legally have to buy insurance to cover their workers' injuries or illnesses when these employees. Workers' compensation insurance helps injured employees to cover related medical treatments and replace lost wages. It is worth noting that employers are not allowed to terminate a worker for filing a claim for workers' compensation. People who have fallen ill or gotten injured while at work certainly have the right to make sure that they receive all of the workers' compensation benefits due to them in light of the situation in North Carolina.

Source: San Jose Mercury News, Martinez: Tesoro workers injured in acid spill, second in a month, Natalie Neysa Alund and Robert Rogers, March 10, 2014

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